Raid Levels Explained

Raid 0 is disk striping. Splits the data across any number of disks which allows for higher through put for the data. There is no redundancy or fault tolerance with Raid 0. If one drive fails it breaks the array and data is lost. Raid 0 is mainly used for live streams and data where speed is important and data loss is not a worry. Minimum number of drives is 2.

Raid 1 is Disk Mirroring. It writes the data to pairs of drives. It provides redundancy and if one disk fails all the information is still available on the remaining disks. Once the failed disk is replaced the data will be rewritten to the new disk. Raid 1 is the easiest raid to create for redundancy. However, this is an expensive option as you are losing half your drive space to redundancy. Minimum number of drives is 2.

Raid 5 is Striping with Parity. Data is striped in data blocks across multiple disks. It also stores parity information which is small amount of information that data can be accurately recreated from if a disk fails. Raid 5 offers speed and redundancy. It uses about 1/3 of the disk drive capacity for parity information. Minimum number of drives is 3.

Raid 6 is striping with double parity. This is basically raid 5 with a second parity block for the information. If two hard drives fail the raid can still be recreated. Minimum number of drives is 4.

Raid 10 is striping and mirroring. This is combination of Raid 0 and Raid 1. It gives you the redundancy of Raid 1 and the performance of raid 0. Minimum number of drives is 4.

Raid 50 is striping and parity. This is a combination of Raid 0 and Raid 5. Minimum number of drives is 6.

Raid 60 is a combination of Raid 0 and Raid 6. Minimum number of drives is 8. The array on Raid 60 can be rebuilt if 2 drives fail.

Dell Poweredge R630 Raid Controllers

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